Charles Dickens Museum

48 Doughty Street
Charles Dickens Museum
A literal house

The Charles Dickens Museum occupies the house which was Dickens’ home from 25 March 1837 to December 1839. The author and his wife Catherine lived here with the eldest three of their ten children; the older two of Dickens' daughters, Mary and Kate Macready were born in the house. Dickens’ younger brother - Frederick - and Catherine's 17-year-old sister - Mary - also lived in the house for a time. Catherine's sister moved with them from Furnival's Inn to offer support to her newly married sister and brother-in-law. It was not unusual for a woman's unwed sister to live with and help a newly married couple. The two years that Dickens lived in the house were extremely productive: he completed The Pickwick Papers (1836), wrote the whole of Oliver Twist (1838) and Nicholas Nickleby (1838–39) and worked on Barnaby Rudge (1840–41). The building at 48 Doughty Street was threatened with demolition in 1923 but was saved by the Dickens Fellowship. The house was renovated and the museum was opened in 1925. It is Dickens’ only surviving London House. Wikipedia/CTGuides